Tag: Culture

DNA Podcast 082 – Character Progression and Gamerisms in Media

In this episode Don and Rob discuss Don’s view that tabletop RPGs and video games have influenced the way people write and consume stories. Delving deep into the topic, the pair discuss Kung Fu movies, westerns, Isekai stories and (naturally) litRPGs. All this and a deep discussion into where Dr. Who went wrong and how it’s connected to sitcoms, are waiting for you in this episode of The Department of Nerdly Affairs.

Closing Music:

Ode to Joy performed by Oliver Eckelt

Things Discussed:

The Lester Dent Pulp Formula
Michael Moorcock’s How to Write a Book in Three Days
White Box Dungeons and Dragons
The Hero’s Journey
Commando (movie)
The Shaw Brothers (That’s all you need to know….)
Horse Operas
The Rebel: Johnny Yuma
Shout Factory TV
Go (the game)
Where Eagles Dare
Die Hard
litRPGs
Dragonball Z
“It’s over 9000!”
Isekai
The Righteous Avenger Plot (from my blog)
Death Wish
WTF Happened to PG-13? (YouTube Video)
No Game No Life (Abridged Version)
Rocky (film)
All the Write Moves by R.A. Paterson
Wired for Story by Lisa Cron
The Kishotenketsu
Buffy The Vanpire Slayer
BLEACH Manga
Hokuto no Ken (Fist of the North Star)
Two Broke Girls
How I Met Your Mother


DNA Podcast 071 – Fake News

In this episode, Don and Rob discuss The News, exploring the past, present and future of our primary source of knowledge about the world around us. In the process, they discuss the relationship between the news makers and the audience, how the news has evolved to meet the needs of different eras, and how the democratic nature of the news actually works against itself. All this, and Ben Franklin’s tips on choosing a mistress, is waiting for you in this episode of the Department of Nerdly Affairs.

Closing Music:

Ode to Joy performed by Oliver Eckelt

Things Discussed:

Steal this Book! (Still available on Amazon.)
Amusing Ourselves to Death
Bards
Benjamin Franklin
Advice to a Friend in Choosing a Mistress by Ben Franklin
The Golden Age of Cinema
Milton Berle
Texaco Star Theatre
Watergate
Don Henley Dirty Laundry
Kennedy Nixon Debate
Vampire LARP
CNN First Broadcast
Culture War Profiteering Episode
Pundits
Citizen Journalism 
NHK World

 


DNA Podcast 059 – Portrayals of Strength in the Media

In this episode, Don and Rob look at cultural views of strength in the media. The pair explore why lead characters being strong is so important to North American audiences, how views of strength have changed over time, and what a strong female fighter really means. All this, and how Free to Be You and Me destroyed a generation, is waiting for you in this episode of the Department of Nerdly Affairs.

Closing Music:

Ode to Joy performed by Oliver Eckelt

Things Discussed

Dynaman
1950’s Education Films and PSAs
Bob Dobbs
Self Actulization
Free To Be You and Me
1970’s Exploitation Films
John Carpenter
Slasher Films
Texas Chainsaw Massacre
Mystery Science Theatre Industrial Arts Film
Dirty Harry
Charles Bronson
Dragnet
Adam 12
Kojak
Baretta
Death Wish
Commando
Cobra (Stallone)
The Hills Have Eyes
Silver Bullet
Nightbreed
Spider Baby
Married with Children
Fight Club
1980’s Action Films
The Rock (movie)
Con Air (movie)
Hippy Movement
90s Milk Ads
Conan the Barbarian
Broadchurch
Twin Peaks
Star Trek: Discovery
Surf Nazis Must Die


DNA Podcast 052- A Brief History of American Comics

In this episode, Rob and Don plunge into the vast history of American comic books and try to make sense of it all. The pair explore the origins of the first comic books, and how the name Gains changed the comic book world not once, but twice! Then they face the challenge of the superheros as Superman’s birth brings about a new age, both in comic books and real life. Finally, they talk about the current comic market, and what flagging sales mean for Marvel and DC’s future. All this, and Brother Power the Geek, is waiting for you in this episode of the Department of Nerdly Affairs.

Closing Music:

Ode to Joy performed by Oliver Eckelt

Things Discussed:

A History of Comic Books (wikipedia)
The Great Canadian Comic Books
Nelvana of the Ether People
Angus MacAskill- The Giant of Cape Breton
Cherry Poptart
The Adventures of Obadiah Oldbuck
Journey to the Gold Diggins
Hogan’s Alley
The Yellow Kid
Birth of a Nation
The Sunday Supplements
Winsor McKay
Little Nemo in Slumberland
Funnies on Parade
New Fun Comics
Doctor Occult
Action Comics #1
Superman
Batman
Superman OTR
Superman vs The KKK
DC Comics
The Shadow
Archie Comics
Wilbur
Dell Comics
Fawcett Comics
EC Comics
Horror Hosts
Vampira
Spook Shows
Seduction of the Innocent
The Senate Subcommittee on Juvenile Delinquincy
Wonder Woman
Dragonball
The Flash
Marvel Comics
MAD Magazine
Robert Crumb
ZAP Comix
Underground Comix
Trashman
Don Heck
Teen Titans
Comics Code Authority
Brother Power the Geek
Harvey Comics
Elfquest
Eclipe Comics
First Comics
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles
Crisis on Infinite Earths
The Black and White Glut
IMAGE Comics
Rob Liefield
Todd McFarlane
Jim Lee
X-Men
Valiant Comics
Malibu Comics
The Death of Superman
Marvel Unlimited

 


DNA Podcast 049 – Star Trekking with Jack Ward

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In this episode, Don and Rob are joined by Jack Ward to go where no man has boldly gone before! The past and future collide as the three discuss the history of Trek and whether or not it’s still relevant in today’s world. All this, and Jack and Rob’s big throwdown on Star Trek Enterprise, is waiting for you in this episode of the Department of Nerdly Affairs.

    Closing Music:

Ode to Joy performed by Oliver Eckelt 

Things Discussed:

Star Trek
Star Trek the Next Generation
Star Trek Deep Space Nine
Star Trek Voyager
Star Trek Enterprise
Star Trek Discovery
Gene Roddenberry
Gene Roddenberry Crashlands Plane
Lucille Ball Star Trek Pilot
Inside Star Trek The Real Story Herb Solo
Star Trek was first TV show that started in Colour
Nichelle Nicols meets Martin Luther King
Solarpunk
Land of the Giants
Gene L. Coon
Gold Key Star Trek Comics
Leonard Nimoy Billboard Story (I can’t find the story, but I can find the ad)
Star Trek Phase II
Free Enterprise
Earth Final Conflict
In Defense of the Male Miniskirt Post on Rob’s Blog
Starlog Magazine
Babylon 5
The Origin of the BORG
Manny Coto
China Bans LGBT Content


DNA Podcast 48 – History of Manga (Part 2)

Dragonball Z

In this episode, Rob and Don finish their discussion of the History of Japanese Comics. Starting in the 1980’s, they discuss the rise and fall of Shonen Jump, how Dragonball changed everything, and how modern manga have been influenced by animation. All this, and Bakuman, in this episode of the Department of Nerdly Affairs.

    Closing Music:

Ode to Joy performed by Oliver Eckelt 

Things Discussed:

Gung Ho (movie)
Shonen Jump
Go Nagai
Shameless School PTA
Pachinko
Rapeman
Young Sunday
Comiket
Moto Haggio
The Group of 24
Japanese Garage Kits
The Japanese Manga Studio System
Journey to the West (The Monkey King)
Fist of the North Star (Hokuto no Ken)
Dr. Slump
Dragonball
Dragonball Z
Jojo’s Bizzare Adventure
Cyber Blue
Sakigake!! Otokojuku
City Hunter
Josei Manga
Mai the Psychic Girl
Slam Dunk
Sailor Moon
Magical Girl Genre
Shonen Jump Sales Chart
One Piece
Naruto
Yu-yu Hakusho
Bakuman
Nakayoshi
Death Note
Hikaru no Go
Wallman
Pokémon or if you prefer….
Yu-Gi-Oh!
Bleach
My Hero Academia
Robot x Lazerbeam
One Punch Man
Franken Fran
Boichi (this sums it up pretty well….)
Dr. Stone


DNA Podcast 044 – Musical Brains

Escucha_musica

 

In this episode, Don and Rob are joined by their friend Richard Moule to discuss music and how it affects us. The trio explore the physical processes behind our reactions and interactions with music and discuss how music and humans evolved together over time. The three also delve into music as soundtrack, and discuss the ways in which moviemakers use music to control and shape the emotions of the audience. All this, and  why John Williams owes Gustav Holst royalties is waiting for you in this episode of the Department of Nerdly Affairs.

    Closing Music:

Ode to Joy performed by Oliver Eckelt 

Things Discussed:

Dr. Daniel Levitan
Sylvanian Nose Flute (earliest musical instrument)
Yoruba Tribe Talking Drums
Edgar Varez (Experimental Composer)
Insane Clown Posse Fucking Magnets How Do they Work?
Troubadours
Skalds
A History of Talkies and Silent Film
Holst’s The Planets
John Carpenter (composer)
Dio
Post-Rock
Invisble Soundtrack Music
Tortoise
Thrill Jockey
Radiohead
Opening to JAWS
Tubular Bells (it’s a classic, but this is my fave take on it!)
Hans Zimmer
Midnight Express
The Revenant
You Could Be Mine
Blood Red Skies
Lalo Schifrin (Dirty Hairy Soundtrack)
John Barry
Barry Gray (actual composer of the Thunderbirds)
Disco
Saturday Night Fever
The Meteors
Music in Neo-Natal Wards
The Simpsons- Yvan Eht Nioj


DNA Podcast 043 – Post Apocalyptic RPGs

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In this episode, Don and Rob are joined again by their friend Chad to discuss Post-Apocalyptic (Tabletop) Role Playing Games. The three discuss the different ways in which an RPG can be Post-Apocalyptic, the importance of post-apocalyptic hygiene, and then go through the history of the Post-Apocalyptic gaming genre with side trips into movies, anime and pop-culture. All this, and why The Flintstones is a post-apocalyptic setting, is waiting for you in this episode of the Department of Nerdly Affairs.

    Closing Music:

Ode to Joy performed by Oliver Eckelt 

Things Discussed:

A History of Post Apocalyptic RPGs
The Oregon Trail
The Road
Mad Max
The Fist of the North Star
Future Shock
The Planet of the Apes
Panic in Year Zero!
Metamorphosis Alpha
Expedition to the Barrier Peaks
The Starlost
Endless Quest- Light On Quests Mountain
Gamma World
Thundarr the Barbarian
Radioactive Dreams
Aftermath FGU
The Late Great Planet Earth
The Morrow Project
Fallout video game
Tri-Tac Games
TMNT RPG
After the Bomb
Road Hogs
Twlight 2000
Traveller
Traveller 2300
Battletech
Robotech
Macross
Southern Cross
Invid Invasion
Mospeda
RIFTS
Logan’s Run
The Omega Man
Beyond the Supernatural
Car Wars
Mutant Year Zero
The End of the World
This is the End (movie)
Apocalypse World
Deadworld
Samurai Jack
World of Darkness


DNA Podcast 041 – Remakes, Sequels and Reboots. Oh My!

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In this episode, Don and Rob sit down to discuss the issues involved with remakes, prequels, sequels and reboots, and why at best they’re a tough act to pull off well, and at worst they’re totally awful. Along the way, they delve into the nature of story itself and how stories reflect the writers and society. All that, and why the Ice Cream Man was an important figure in Star Wars lore (at least according to Don), is waiting for you in this episode of the Department of Nerdly Affairs.

    Closing Music:

Ode to Joy performed by Oliver Eckelt 

Things Discussed:

Romance Novel Formula
The Anatomy of Story
Humans are wired to learn through story.
Friday the 13th
SCREAM
Why The Force Awakens Bombed in China
Murder Mystery Formula
Audiences Like Films Better when they know what happens
The Green Hornet: movie and character
The Phantom Edit
Star Wars Ice Cream Man (Willrow Hood)


DNA Podcast 034 – What are litRPGs?

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Don and Rob are joined by the awesome Ramon Meija of the litRPG podcast to talk about the biggest new genre you’ve probably never heard of- litRPGs. The three discuss the origins of the genre, what makes a litRPG, what books you should be checking out, and how the litRPG genre reflects the world we live in today. All that, and how to write litRPGs in this episode of the Department of Nerdly Affairs!

    Closing Music:

Ode to Joy performed by Oliver Eckelt 

Things Discussed:

The litRPG Podcast
Gate of Revelation (the novel Rob couldn’t remember the name of where our world is the game world)
The King’s Avatar (another one Rob mentioned)
Legendary Moonlight Sculptor (English fan translation)
Adventures on Terra: Beginnings (Ramon’s Book! Check it out!)
Sword Art Online
Ready Player One
litRPG Forum- LitRPG Forum – Books, Geeks, & Gamification

 

Ramon’s Extensive Notes for the show:

What are litRPGs?

    • LitRPG or literary RPGs are stories that incorporate role playing game mechanics.
    • There’s a facebook group dedicated to LitRPG (https://www.facebook.com/groups/LitRPGGroup/) that’s had that discussion several times. As a group, we’ve come up with two identifying marks of LitRPG. I’ll paraphrase them:
    • 1) The story must exist, at least partially, in a world with expressly stated game mechanics. This can mean that the story is set in an MMO, a VR game, an RPG game, or even a parallel or alien world. As long as there are expressly stated game mechanics. For example: Level up Notifications, Experience Points given for completing quests or killing monsters, learning game skills, health/mana bars.
    • 2) The main character progresses in an expressly stated way. For example: Leveling up, Increasing skills or abilities, increasing ranks, or increasing reputation.  Also by expressly stated, I mean that it says it in the text of the book and isn’t something that’s inferred or something only the author would be aware of.
    • The easiest and most common way this is done is usually something like this:
    • “A blue notification screen appeared before the character.
    • You’ve gained 1 level.”
    • It’s not complicated. It’s just not hidden in the background of the story or some table of information only the author sees. This type of information is conveyed to the reader. LitRPG, or literary RPG, merges the things gamers love about RPGs and MMOs and a good sci-fi or fantasy story. Those guidelines allow for maximum storytelling flexibility while maintaining the core elements of the genre.

How popular are they?

    • Among the fans, amazingly popular. LitRPG stories are like literary crack to the fans. They just can’t get enough stories. I’ve personally read over 300 LitRPG novels and online stories this year.
  • How big is the fandom?
    • Our facebook group has about 3,000 members.
    • Over 7,000 people visit the Royal Road regularly, a place where people post a lot of free/amature LitRPG.
    • FogCon, a literary convention is considering adding a panel on the genre.
    • It’s also a lot more popular in countries like Russia, Korea, China, and Japan.

Where did the genre come from?

    • There have been stories set in Virtual Reality and game worlds since the 1970s, when there was a virtual reality boom. However, the recent explosion of LitRPG originates overseas in places Korea with the Legendary Moonlight Sculptor (2007), a story set in a virtual reality massively multiplayer online game (VRMMO). With the popularization of gaming culture worldwide LitRPG stories spread throughout Korea, China, Japan, and Russia.
    • It’s only in the last 5 years or so that it’s spread to the U.S because those international works were translated into English either by fans or specialized publishing companies like Magic Dome Books.   

Where did the term litRPG come from?

    • Vasily Mahanenko, a Russian LitRPG author of Way of the Shaman, says he and another author came up with the term LitRPG or Literary RPG to describe their brand of fiction that has their stories set in game worlds (2012).

Why do people enjoy litRPGs?

    • They’re fun. It’s the same reason people like to play video games and tabletop RPGs.They’re fun. They incoporate game rules that make sense to the reader. I’ve played video games for twenty years so the worlds that LitRPG stories exist in make more sense to me sometimes than the real world. Additionally many LitRPG stories speculate about a future where full immersion VR exists and people can explore their favorite MMOs as if they were real worlds. What gamer wouldn’t like that kind of world?

What do you wish people understood about litRPGs? (What is most people’s misunderstanding about them?

    • I don’t know that the genre has been around in the U.S. long enough for people to misunderstand LitRPG.
    • I guess if I there was one thing, is that while a lot LitRPG has video games as their base, not all video game fiction is LitRPG. They need to hit those two qualifies we talked about earlier: 1) Set in a Game World with expressly stated game mechanics, and 2) character growth in game terms.

How did you get into them?

    • I fell into the rabbit hole that is LitRPG through my love of another geek culture. Anime. I saw the anime Sword Art Online and fell in love with the idea of living in a game world. So much so that I searched the internet for the original Korean Light novel that the anime was based on. I found that I enjoyed the books more and searched the internet for more like it. I read a ton of translated LitRPG from Japan and Korea. When I exhausted those sources I started trolling fan sites like the Royal Road and then paying good money for new stories on Amazon. Now I spend most of my waking hours either reading, writing, or podcasting about LitRPG.

What are the most popular LitRPGs and where do people find them?

Why did you start the LitRPG podcast?

    • I love LitRPG. I started interviewing LitRPG authors on my podcast the Geek Bytes Podcast as a way to express that love to those listeners and found they were really popular. So I spun it into it’s own podcast where I talk about LitRPG news, reviews and author interviews. The community has responded well.

What are some of the challenges of writing LitRPGs?

    • The same challenges as writing normal. Figuring out a good story to tell and getting people to read it. Some of the unique challenges are figuring out the game rules your story uses. Most of the LitRPG authors I’ve interviewed have multiple spreadsheets to keep track of all the formulas they use, character sheets, skill and ability descriptions, and research material. That and how all your readers are gamer and are more than willing to point out the flaws in your game systems.
    • Adventures on Terra: Beginnings http://amzn.to/2fXJRfw